Dutch is spoken by the 15 million inhabitants of the Netherlands, and is also the official language of Surinam in South America, and of the Netherlands Antilles in the Caribbean Sea. The name Dutch comes from the word Dietsc, or Duutsc, as the language was called in the Middle Ages. It meant "language of the people."

Dutch, is one of the Germanic languages, and thus part of the Indo-European family. It is related to Frisian, German and English. In the late 1930s, Dutch was made the official language of the northern part of Belgium. Both Belgium and the Netherlands use a common literary language, termed standard Netherlandic or standard Dutch. Dutch vocabulary has contributed many words to the English language. For example, yacht, easel, cookie, and freight all come from Dutch. Spoken In: Netherlands, Belgium, Suriname, Aruba, Netherlands Antilles, South Africa, Indonesia. Region: North-west Europe and former colonies. Official Language Of: Aruba, Belgium, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles and Suriname.

It’s Probably The Easiest Foreign Language For Native English Speakers To Learn

Given their Germanic roots, Dutch, German, and English bear some similarities; Dutch is probably somewhere in the middle between English and German. While Dutch does enjoy leaving the verb at the end of the sentence occasionally, like in German, it doesn’t have the cases German does, which makes it more akin to English. Further, where German has three (nominative) definite articles, der, die, das, and English one, the, Dutch has two, de and het..

You Already Speak Some Dutch

If you’ve ever eaten coleslaw after leaving some cookies for Santa Claus, then you’ve definitely used a few Dutch words, including: koolsla, koekje, and Sinterklaas. There are many other words in English that are similar to their Dutch cousins, such as: appel = apple banaan = banana blauw = blue groen = green peer = pear rood = red tomaat = tomato So, you see, you’re half way to learning Dutch already!

The Dutch Language, Like English, Is A Cheeky Thief!

That’s right, Dutch is guilty of ‘stealing’ words from all over the place, especially from French and Hebrew, as well as several other languages. If you were a right posh Dutch-speaking person back-in-the-day, you dropped French words into conversation every now and again just to show how posh and upper-class you were. Many of them stuck! Amongst lots of others, Dutch words of French origin include: au pair (nanny), bouillon (broth), bureau (desk or office), humeur (mood), jus d’orange (orange juice), pantalon (pants), etc. Some Hebraic words made it into Dutch as street slang, including: bajes (jail), geinig (funny), jatten (steal), mazzel (lucky), tof (cool). Nowadays, Dutch finds itself influenced by the variety of cultures that speak it and the multiculturalist society of the Netherlands. You might hear street slang comprised of Moroccan, Surinamese, and Antillean words, and of course English is all pervasive in all modern genres of Dutch, especially “social media language” and texting abbreviations.

Given their Germanic roots, Dutch, German, and English bear some similarities; Dutch is probably somewhere in the middle between English and German. While Dutch does enjoy leaving the verb at the end of the sentence occasionally, like in German, it doesn’t have the cases German does, which makes it more akin to English. Further, where German has three (nominative) definite articles, der, die, das, and English one, the, Dutch has two, de and het..

It’s Probably The Easiest Foreign Language For Native English Speakers To Learn

Given their Germanic roots, Dutch, German, and English bear some similarities; Dutch is probably somewhere in the middle between English and German. While Dutch does enjoy leaving the verb at the end of the sentence occasionally, like in German, it doesn’t have the cases German does, which makes it more akin to English. Further, where German has three (nominative) definite articles, der, die, das, and English one, the, Dutch has two, de and het..

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